Introduction to Chess

I thought it might be helpful that I post this up, as my future blog entry would refer pretty much to Chess Game- The game of war, and love played by many ancient Kings and Queens, the Lords and the Ladies, as well as commoners alike.

This is an image of ‘CHESS BOARD’ with chess pieces on it.

Chess pieces consists of:

From left to right, and their moves according to the rules of the game:

The King– The King can be moved one space in any direction but the King cannot be moved to a square that will cause him to be in check by the opponent.

The Queen-  The Queen can be moved as many spaces as you want in any direction (including diagonal). It is usually considered to be the most powerful piece on the board. The Queen can move as far in any direction as the board will allow, or as short as one square away from its original position. But If the Queen is capturing another piece, it must stop on the square that the piece occupied.

Bishop– The Bishop can be moved diagonally as many spaces as you want. It cannot move in a straight line. Due to their movement abilities, Bishops will always end up on the same colored square (either light or dark) on which they started the game. The Bishop can move as far in one diagonal direction as the board will allow, or as short as one square away from its original position.

Knight– On each move, the Knight moves three spaces, two spaces up, down, left or right and then one space perpendicular to the first move. The move is done in an “L” shape. The Knight is the only piece on the board that can jump over other pieces during its move. The Knight will always end up on an opposite colored square from where it started. One of the “sneaky” piece in the game of chess that’s often being overlooked in a chess game once the game commenced.

Rook (Castle)-  The Rook can be moved as many spaces as you want in any direction (except diagonal). The Rook can move as far in one direction as the board will allow, or as short as one square away from its original position. And like all other chess pieces, if the Rook is taking another piece, it must stop on the square that the piece occupied. More often than not, Rook served to “guard” The King and could exchange place with the King in a move known as “Rooking” or “Castling”.

Pawn– The Pawn only moves in a forward direction, one tile at a time. However, if it is the pawn’s first move of the game, the player has the option of moving forward either 1 or 2 tile squares. After that, they are only allowed to to move one square forward at a time. Pawns capture an opponent’s chess piece with a 1-tile diagonal move only allowed when taking an opponent’s piece. Pawns cannot be moved backwards.


Cleffairy: Each of them have their own purpose and powers in a chess game, and that alone, would make any chess game interesting.

12 comments

    • Cleffairy says:

      I bet you used to play wif your girl. *SOBS* I’m no longer living with daddy dearest. Sobs… now no more chess kaki. SOBBBBSSS! SO sad!

  1. Alv0808 says:

    I played it before the very basic one hehhehe. I guess, the chinese chess very complicated..on day I’ll go and try it since this games a very popular right now. Even the apek at coffeeshop also played with it..lol..

  2. Mommy Ling says:

    Ages not touching chess set.i can play but the in a few mins, the King will get baham…wahaha..cos i kenot think of ways to fight…only know how to move foreward…ahhahah..

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