Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

My husband once commented that our autistic son enjoys expensive and luxurious things that only the rich could afford. I would love to refute that, cuz somehow, it sounded like a negative critism, but I couldn’t deny my husband’s statement, cuz in a way, the boy’s taste IS kinda expensive…be it food or entertainment wise. He enjoyed live performance and whatnot.  I brought him to a ballet performance quite some time ago and he enjoyed it immensely, something that comes quite a surprise for me cuz usually he will have a meltdown in crowded and confined places.

And being autistic, the cost of raising him is also VERY high. Some friends even wondered how we could even afford the whole maintenance package, and in some ways, I kinda get wary at people commenting that I should cut the cost down a lil bit and whatnot, something I don’t think is quite possible to do. To me…it’s simple. If raising him is expensive, then I’ll just have to take a more high paying jobs and project. Not the other way around. I want exposure for my son, not restricting him in some stupid proverbial box. My method of parenting may not be conventional…but these few months, I could see some improvements after I implemented it. Some people may not notice it, but I do. And some friends commented that my son now has more eye-contact, more calm demeanor, more communication attempts, and more and more milestone being hit in a short period of time. So I guess…despite of criticism from obnoxious and ignorant people regarding my son’s milestone and behaviour, I must be doing something right with the changes in his routine and diet.

Anyway, enough ramblings. I won’t be writing much. Just wanna share a little something with all of you readers out there. My latest attempt in trying to get him to improve his concentration and focus along in breaking the routine though musical instrument. 😀

My son’s Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. Nothing near perfect, but I’m happy enough cuz he managed to complete the whole song. 😀

Cleffairy: Maybe…just maybe…his brain is just wired differently, so don’t expect him to ‘slow down’ just so that you can catch up!

 

19 comments

    • Cleffairy says:

      I learned that all the while I have been doing this the wrong way cuz I listen to people who dunno any better about autism. Kids like mine thrive better when they are encouraged to do what they are good at rather than what they cannot do.

  1. mnhl says:

    yes…he needs encouragement and u r doing great with him. I like your methods by providing what’s necessary instead of cutting them down when expenses got too high. Great job, boy !

  2. Twilight Man says:

    Mother Knows Best!!! The saying goes like that, so you should only trust your own judgement of parenting. There is no book in this world that could teach you exactly how to bring up kids to become perfectly behaved and roll out from Harvard. Those books only offer some examples and insight whereby parents will decide what’s best at the end of the day. Your son is handsome looking and his progress may be slow but I believe he will reach a certain age when his achievements will suddenly pick up fast and take you by surprise. My mother also suspected that I was autistic child as she noticed I started talking very late for a baby. I was much quieter when compared to my older siblings and other kids. I did very badly in Standard 1 & 2, failing almost all subjects! My father started coaching my revisions at home and I managed to improve slowly until I became top of the class in Standard 6. It took me so long to achieve something in school but I still hated all my school life for many reasons. In the end I went to US to pursue my studies and often received honour’s list every semesters which pleased my worried mother. I am not bragging but I also thought that my brain is wired differently too!!!

    • Cleffairy says:

      Yea, I guess you’re right, and I have been doing things the wrong way because I care too much about what people say about my son’s milestone and achievement. It’s not what about the society wants…I used to think that I should raise my son in a way that the society will accept him. But it’s all wrong. I mean I can’t please everyone. They will never be satisfied and will always find faults no matter what. And people will always compare. At the end of the day, I get all stressed up and depressed cuz I can’t meet all the demands…it did us no good all these years, so I thought I’d try a different approach, and it works. Can see some improvements…maybe some people won’t notice it but at least it works, and we are happier now.

  3. lina says:

    Every kid is special in their own way. Much respect to you, patiently raising him. 🙂

    A friend of mine has an autistic son too and it’s a battle for her daily. To make sure the son is safe. To be patient. To make people understand autism too.

    Stay strong and enjoy his luxurious taste. ^^

    • Cleffairy says:

      It is hell on earth for us who have autistic children…especially when even our own families condemn us for bad parenting etc whenever they don’t hit milestones like normal children does. I could feel your friend…it is not easy, especially if your kid is non verbal, not potty trained at at advance age, etc and worst, there are times even your spouse accuse you for all sort of things. Nobody understands how it is like to raise such a child unless they are in our shoes, period!

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