The Butterfly Effect

The Butterfly Effect is my second gift book from Booksneeze, and I have to say that I’m impressed with the glossy illustration for this book.

Initially, The Butterfly Effect is ametaphor that encapsulates the concept of sensitive dependence on initial conditions in chaos theory; namely that small differences in the initial condition of a dynamical system may produce large variations in the long term behavior of the system.

Although this may appear to be an esoteric and unusual behavior, it is exhibited by very simple systems: for example, a ball placed at the crest of a hill might roll into any of several valleys depending on slight differences in initial position.

The butterfly effect is a common trope in fiction when presenting scenarios involving time travel and with “what if” scenarios where one storyline diverges at the moment of a seemingly minor event resulting in two significantly different outcomes.

However, The Butterfly Effect by Andy Andrews is about about a decision one man made over a hundred years ago, and the ‘echo’ effect it’s had on each and every one of individually today.

It’s a story that will inspire courage and wisdom in the decisions we make, as well as affect the way we treat others through our lifetime.

A very motivational read. However… the examples from the books are purely American stories. I find it rather hard to relate to it considering I am not one, and I am not familiar with American histories.

Do I recommend this book to others? Well… I do, but I don’t think everyone could relate to the story if they are not born and bred in America.

I rate this book, 3 star out of 5, excellent gift for your American friends.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their Booksneeze bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review and therefore, the book review is 100% my own opinion.

is a metaphor that encapsulates the concept of sensitive dependence on initial conditions in chaos theory; namely that small differences in the initial condition of a dynamical system may produce large variations in the long term behavior of the system. Although this may appear to be an esoteric and unusual behavior, it is exhibited by very simple systems: for example, a ball placed at the crest of a hill might roll into any of several valleys depending on slight differences in initial position. The butterfly effect is a common trope in fiction when presenting scenarios involving time travel and with “what if” scenarios where one storyline diverges at the moment of a seemingly minor event resulting in two significantly different outcomes.

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